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Tommy RoweCyril Sealy - Jeremy Pugh - Jenny Price - Doreen Page - Judy Neve - Angus Davis - Rosemary Knight

Name:
Rosemary Knight
Email:
 
Subject:
Painting
Dates:
1960-62
Date:
18 January, 2018

Comments

First of all, a big congratulations and thanks for all the hard work you’ve put into this very impressive site. I came across it only a few days ago and have spent the time since reminiscing. It was so good to see places and faces from my time there. I can’t believe that 55 years have passed since I left after those life changing 2 years. 

However, on my second visit, I found a photo of me on Steve Collingbourne’s entry and, on scrolling down, a description that I found a little upsetting. I think anyone reading it would envisage a lazy, aloof and unpopular person which I don’t think I can pass over even though so many years have passed and it is only an opinion. 

I was lazy after the Intermediate exams. I did spend too much time at the pool and I deserved to be sent down. However, I was not given any warning of this at the time as I would have given to my students. There was only a phone call to my father during the summer holidays offering a reference to any school of my choice. I was gutted. 

As for cold; I think the description of photos pinned up for selection says a lot about attitudes in those days. I had come from a rather strict background with a female only, very intellectual education since the age of eight. No brothers. So meeting boys who set light to their farts was eye opening! I made friends and was soon giving haircuts to the boys for a pint in the cellar. I don’t remember having turned down any offer that year except one from a well known art critic after the Thursday lecture. We all knew what that meant so I, a virgin, refused. I had occasion to be thankful later when one of my friends found herself pregnant by a visiting tutor and was given the money for an abortion. All are dead now so no names. Added to having come from a more humble social background than many, I think bewilderment and nervousness were my feelings not aloofness. 

I wasn’t unpopular with the people who I went around with. I never felt either popular or unpopular. I kept in touch with a few afterwards. I visited afterwards. Then life took over with my new college. I met up with some from Corsham on ATD and they didn’t shun me! 

I suppose all of this is written for Steve but I couldn’t find any way of writing to him. (his address has been sent to you in an email - Gerry)

I’d like to end on a positive note.

I learned my lesson and worked hard later!
I remember spending a fascinating time with Lord Methuen when I wandered into the orchid house one day. He showed me some beautiful specimens and explained some features. 
I lived in the Warden’s House and walked through the avenue to the Court. The green of the new lime tree leaves was breathtaking in springtime. 
Breakfast in the amazing dining room. The toast was thick and usually cold which meant that you could put loads of butter on before the marmalade. Delicious. Ive never been able to reproduce it. 
The impressive panels in the Chinese room where I had my interview.
The wonderful setting that means I’ve always after chosen country places to live.

I’m now in southern Spain in the mountains in a small village. I’m still working myself and giving voluntary sessions to the local children in the tiny school here. I’m using all my accumulated art materials that won’t be needed. 

I’d be happy to get news from contemporaries so my email is available. 

Thank you once again

Rosie x 

Name:
Angus Davis
Email:
 
Subject:
Graphic Design
Dates:
1965-68
Date:
09 September, 2017

Comments

Am still alive and living in New Zealand. It was a significant 3 years. (Pre-Dip in London).
I do have many memories of 'Dip AD' at Corsham, even one or two photos am happy to share if I can figure my way through this strange machine.

Another Graphics student Steve Lowndes lives not ten miles from here today, currently he is Acting Chairman of ‘Environment Canterbury’ so don’t think he has much time to go to his comfortable painting studio (Banks Peninsula/NZ); his flat mate at Corsham, Derick Sowden still lives near Bristol and visited here some years ago with his Wife. Ian Lawson still alive in Herefordshire (Aymestrey). William Bradley was in Australia last time I heard, always a total incompetent he gave me an incorrect e-mail address so have lost touch.

I noted the folder from John Furnival containing our ‘concrete poetry’ the cover was designed & printed by me (I still have it). Will copy images from Concrete Poetry Project in the next few days, I have complete set of 15 plus information sheet - a limited edition of 30 mine is #25. Also worked on the Jim Dine project but nothing left from that one.

In my trundling around the planet at odd times bumped into ex Corshamites. If someone gets in touch would be happy to contribute some memories, I have plenty of yarns. Already heard back from Gordon Thompson, not bad after 50 years!

Rosemary Ellis was a beast but my partner Victoria & I visited them in Urchfont several times on trips from the USA, after she & Clifford retired, we mended the bridges.

When I left I went to collect my deposit, the Warden at Beechfield, John Vince had levied a five shilling fine, for my having 'broken curfew. We were allowed 2 weekends per term out, and had class half day on Saturday, until it was discovered that a 5˝ day week was not allowed.

This photo taken by our group photo instructor from Switzerland, Marlen Gruber.
click for enlargements

Car park at the back of Beechfield House left to right; half a face on side Debbie (?); Jenny Gunn, William Bradley, Chris Dunn, Toby Birch, Gregg Hull, Angus Davis - myself in the driving seat 1932 'Austin 7’ - all Graphic Design Students 1965-68

Lower figure is Steve Lowndes (Graphics 1964-68) the other fellow was Mike ?.

Paul Ansell (Aggie) from the same group (Graphics).
I heard from Jenny Gunn that he died just this last Easter.

This student was his girlfriend at the time, cannot remember her name. Photo taken with Wells Cathedral for backdrop.


Steve had a pink Hillman convertible in which the photo is taken, he went around with a student called Sally Englebach, who’s claim to fame was that that she spent more years at Corsham than any other student, again really don’t know the reason why.

It will be great if some other contemporaries get in touch.

Name:
Judy Neve (Portway)
Email:
 
Subject:
NDD Course
Dates:
1959-61
Date:
15 January, 2017

Comments

Just found your site via a look at the Clifford and Rosemary Ellis sale today, which happily sent me in the direction of photos of my year! I have some photos too and will unearth them!
My name was Judy Neve, I am now Judy Portway and still in touch with Chris Rose.

In the summer I went back to Corsham and went round the state rooms and came away amazed that I had forgotten the wonderful paintings - apart from the allegorical painting of Elizabeth l.

Best wishes,
Judy

Name:
Doreen Page (Foster)
Email:
 
Subject:
NDD Course
Dates:
1948-50
Date:
15 January, 2017

Comments

I was one of the first students to be chosen to attend the Bath Academy of Art when it opened in Corsham in 1948, I was 18 years of age. I am a coalminers daughter and one of the few working class girls to be accepted plus the only Northerner.
My life was changed completely by my experience and sent me on a very interesting career in varied branches of education.
I am now 88, have no email but can be contacted by letter via the sites email.

Yours Hopefully,
Doreen

Name:
Jenny Price
Email:
 
Subject:
on Stephen Russ
Dates:
1972-75
Date:
10 June, 2016

Comments

I was at BAA from 1972 - 75 on the 3D-design ceramics course.

I can mostly say like someone else's comment that Stephen Russ gave the impression of being able to talk to. Maybe this overseas student did once or twice, but on thinking back I might have tried to concentrate on registering the silk screen to produce something, the process wasn't so easy for me. He was a homely natured person to me and appeared as happy being distracted into talking about his exquisite lyre making as he was teaching silk- screening. His company was like stepping back in time to another few generations or at least the contrast of his environment at Monks Park was more preferred to some of the other disciplines in the sense of there seeming to be breathing space here where everywhere else was more rushed to get work done.

Name:
Jeremy Pugh
Email:
 
Subject:
A Lord Methuen encounter!
Dates:
1980-83
Date:
23 April, 2016

Comments

I was just recalling an incident from around 1987.

The four of us from graphics third year on the first floor of Beechfield house, at the front overlooking the supplies hut and the canteen lawn next to the office with Angela (absolutely charming) met up in Corsham. Jeff King and his girlfriend Juliette, soon to be and still his wife, Ray Brooking, Elaine Jones and Gary, still together I believe, plus Eleanor my wife (no longer) and Blue, our Alsatian-collie cross.
It was an extremely quiet day and we felt free to wander around as ex- students, not so much as we owned the place but we felt we belonged in some way. We took photographs by the cedar tree and were mooching around like tourists when a gaunt figure strode purposefully up the drive from the court. Initially we thought 'grumpy gardener' as the man was dressed in beige casuals and wore an ancient battered and rather grubby narrow-brimmed trilby.
When he was within ten yards or so he bellowed "What the hell are you doing here, we're closed". We politely explained we were simply old students on a benign nostalgia trip.
Gradually the penny dropped.. the aristocratic nose, hawk features, scruffy but clearly expensive attire and high end brogues! He was visibly flushed and clearly fuming.
Lord Paul Methuen was not a familiar figure to me as shamefully I spent more time in the Pack Horse than in the college library. He was not over intimidating and there were six of us with a big dog after all.
He approached further and confronted us all. He then forcibly asserted his position with the unforgettable words: "I'm Lord Methuen, GET ORF MY LAND".
Well we did. Somewhere I still have a blurry photo of him walking away down his drive.

Frighteningly I realise this is almost thirty years ago now.
Corsham has become my spiritual home above Chippenham! I hope to return someday in one form or other.

Name:
Cyril Sealy
Email:
 
Subject:
My father at Corsham
Dates:
1947-51
Date:
26 September, 2015

Comments

I noticed on the website that my father's name does not appear on the list of ex-students of Corsham Court and I'd dearly love to put that right.

When my father, Cyril Clifford Sealy, left the RAF at the end of WWII he enrolled for a three-year ( 1947 - 1950 ) course at Corsham and then, at the end of that course, he stayed for the Supplementary Course until the summer of 1951.
After that he started his career in education, teaching Art and Music in various secondary schools until his retirement; he died at the age of 80 in 2003. I'm attaching a copy of his Pass Certificate, dated 7th July 1950, which also includes the names of all the other students who were successful that year. You can also see the certificate that he and four other students received at the end of the Supplementary Course, together with the covering letter that he received in Sept.1951.

One of the people with whom my father became friendly during those years was Henry Cliffe, later to become a member of staff at BAA and an artist in his own right. After my father played the organ for Henry's wedding, Henry presented my father with a small painting which is now in the possession of my daughter who has subsequently collected other works by Cliffe. Looking on Google, I see that Cliffe exhibited fairly widely and that his paintings have commanded reasonable prices when they have appeared at auction.

I'm not sure whether any of this information is of interest to you but it would be lovely to see Cyril Sealy's name on your website's list of ex-students.

Phil Sealyclick for enlargements

Name:
Tommy Rowe
Email:
 
Subject:
Sculpture with John Hoskins
Dates:
1960-63
Date:
30 March, 2015

Comments

The Hare and Hounds ,The Methuen Arms, The Harp and Crown, The Roebuck, The Royal Oak, The Packhorse, The Cross Keys, and the one and only DUKE OF CUMBERLAND. The nights at Box Caves, and the queues outside the doctors surgery the following day to repair damaged heads and limbs who can forget such an education.

 

Archive photo found July 2018
l-r Dave Stoodley : Jim Newton : person unknown : Dave Berriman
and other "blurred" pics from my past

John Law the most photographed man in Beechfield and my good neighbour for three years

Valdemar Miadovitch

Dave Stoodley or Valdemar with the cat

Valdemar and Dave French

Me, Tommy Rowe with hat

The girls escape route out onto the main A4

The Bath House

The Court

The Lake

The picture of John Law reminded me of that idiotic weekly event they called Design Day. We would be set an individual project which we had to complete by the following week, when it would be displayed and discussed, this usually involved making something out of anything. Later this format was used on television, where it was known as Blue Peter.
One week we were asked to produce a work which was the result of an uncontrolled event. John Law decided to produce a painting which would be the result of an explosion. I had no idea how he would achieve this but he said "we'll make a bomb". This would apparently involve weed killer or fertiliser and something else. I didn't believe it would work, but agreed to be sorcerers apprentice, this involved pouring the mixture into a length of copper pipe and hammering the ends shut, I did this on the hearth of my fireplace.
On the day we took everything out on to the field, at what we thought would be a safe distance. The "bomb" was placed between two concrete blocks, on top of this was placed a tile holding tins of paint containing carefully selected colours, on top of all this was a beautifully primed board. We lit the fuse, a piece of string soaked in saltpetre and waited, I still didn't believe anything would happen, so imagine my surprise, when there was an almighty bang and the whistling sound of shrapnel not I imagine unlike the trenches of W.W.1 As we approached through the smoke to the edge of the pit we could see there was very little left to produce a painting, but we managed to collect enough debris to make an acceptable collage.
HAPPY DAYS.

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